University says women should be advised of their Breast Density!!

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  • arpie
    arpie Member Posts: 7,801
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    That really DOES suck! @Kattykit .... I guess we have always assumed, that the earlier it is found, hopefully the better the result - but sadly, we also now know that even the earliest detection doesn’t preclude us  from developing Stage 4. :(

    They keep making ‘excuses’ for having dense breast tissue - that they are more dense when you are young and it will decrease in density as you get older, that breast feeding can cause it - and you can inherit it ... bullshit - they haven’t got a clue, they than they KNOW it can cause a delay in detection and knowingly refuse to do anything about it.  I was 65 when my tumours were found - how old do you have to be before they start becoming less dense? .... I had my first ‘cyst scare’ in my 20s and was told then that I had lumpy breasts (euphemism for dense breasts.)  So I’ve ALWAYS had dense breast tissue - but until joining this site, I had no idea of the increased danger it represented re BC and that it delays the finding of the tumours .... and that made me SO ANGRY!

    If they suddenly found something that helped identify testicular and Prostate cancer a lot earlier ... I bet they’d be broadcasting it from the hilltops!

    The Yanks are advising women of their breast density .... so should we!
    https://www.allinahealth.org/healthysetgo/heal/should-you-worry-about-that-breast-density-letter
  • FLClover
    FLClover Member Posts: 1,561
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    @arpie ✅✅✅. I knew my breasts were lumpy, but had no idea lumpy meant dense. They weren’t that full or perky, so even if I had known about density, I wouldn’t have thought that mind are. That’s how ignorant I was, and not by choice. When I told my GP in 2018 that I wanted another ultrasound (had had one in 2016), she said I didn’t need one, even though I told her my breasts were lumpy and I had no idea what was what, even if I did do self checks. She said if you feel anything suspicious, monitor it. I thought stuff it, it’s too confusing, and left praying that I wouldn’t get it or that I’d find it early if I did. Second thing happened. I was just lucky, not educated. We need to be more educated!
  • NoShrinkingViolet
    NoShrinkingViolet Member Posts: 28
    edited April 2021
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    @arpie @AllyJay @Kattykit @Cath62  Scroll to the 15 April post on the BreastScreen NSW Facebook page to see a splendid example of its disabling the display of contra-arguments. https://www.facebook.com/BreastScreenNSW/ 

    At last check there were 60 comments, with a majority criticising BreastScreen NSW's failure to promote the availability of screening mammograms for women starting at age 40.  There were a few comments critical of its failure to assess breast density and to screen dense breasts properly (unlike private clinics and BreastScreen WA).

    BreastScreen NSW refuses to promote the fact that mammograms are freely available to the female residents and taxpayers of NSW from age 40.  For the 15 April thread, BreastScreen NSW disabled viewing of 'All comments' and restricted viewing to 'Most relevant'.  BreastScreen NSW restricts viewing in this manner carte blanche in order to extinguish a thread.
  • FLClover
    FLClover Member Posts: 1,561
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    @NoShrinkingViolet 😲😲😲😡😡😡
  • AllyJay
    AllyJay Member Posts: 955
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    @NoShrinkingViolet...they have deleted more than one comment I've made before regarding medicare paying from age 40 without referral from doctor. Once I had a token response along the lines of ....younger women...dense breasts...false positives and stress...blah blah blah. When I responded that I was sure most women would rather have a scare and not have cancer, than forgo the potential scare until too late. At that point, all was erased.
  • NoShrinkingViolet
    NoShrinkingViolet Member Posts: 28
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    @AllyJay Yep,
    BreastScreen NSW employs the mantra of 'younger women, dense breasts, false
    positives and the stress caused' ad nauseum as its rationale for not promoting its mammogram
    program to women starting at age 40.



    Mention older women, dense breasts, false
    negatives (i.e. 'all clear letters' despite harbouring breast cancer) and
    BreastScreen NSW's silence is deafening.  It fails to tailor screening to
    the requirements of each woman but employs a woefully inadequate
    one-size-fits-all approach. 



    The BreastScreen Reader Assessment Strategy
    (BREAST) at the University of Sydney notes a mammogram detection failure rate
    of about 30% with many missed cancers being visible on the image.
    https://breast-australia.sydney.edu.au/



    Every year the Australian Institute of Health and
    Welfare (AIHW) releases the BreastScreen Australia Monitoring Report - here's a
    link to the 2020 report. 
    BreastScreen
    Australia monitoring report 2020 (aihw.gov.au)
      P. 32 cites that over the past twenty years
    BreastScreen Australia's rate of detecting cancers at the 'small' stage (≤15
    mm) has been declining.

  • AllyJay
    AllyJay Member Posts: 955
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    According to Breast Cancer Research (Australia) around 21% of new cancer diagnosis are in women younger than 50. Unless you fall into their age range bracket...tough titty. They receive state and government funding...that is..we, the taxpayers, pay their salaries, but those younger and older are left out to dry. They will still be paid by medicare for extended (both younger and older) patients for screening, yet they only advertise their "target" age. We the taxpayers also pay for the advertising....but I digress. In essence, that is misleading information. I was in the bank one day, and the lovely lady who always helps me, said to me that she was turning 55 the next year, and she would be sure to book her first mammogram. When I told her she could get one then and not wait another year, for free, no doctor referral needed, she didn't believe me at first. She said to me that all the media only mentioned 55 and so she had been waiting for that magical age to tick over. I'm sure this is the general impression....I'm not old enough to get breast cancer...I only have to be on my guard after 55. So very wrong on so many levels, and as you mention, when you try to highlight this in one of their facebook advertising posts, you're muzzled. If you don't join in with the ra ra ... yippee....breastscreen saved my life mantra, they'll just click the button and make you go away.
  • NoShrinkingViolet
    NoShrinkingViolet Member Posts: 28
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    @AllyJay Yep, BreastScreen NSW employs the mantra of 'younger women, dense breasts, false positives and the stress caused' ad nauseum as its rationale for not promoting its mammogram program to women starting at age 40.

    Mention older women, dense breasts, false negatives (i.e. 'all clear letters' despite harbouring breast cancer) and BreastScreen NSW's silence is deafening.  It fails to tailor screening to the requirements of each woman but takes a woefully inadequate one-size-fits-all approach. 

    The BreastScreen Reader Assessment Strategy (BREAST) at the University of Sydney notes a mammogram detection failure rate of about 30% with many missed cancers being visible on the image. https://breast-australia.sydney.edu.au/

    Every year the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) releases the BreastScreen Australia Monitoring Report - here's a link to the 2020 report. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2020 (aihw.gov.au)  P. 32 cites that over the past twenty years BreastScreen Australia's rate of detecting cancers at the 'small' stage (≤15 mm) has been declining.
  • NoShrinkingViolet
    NoShrinkingViolet Member Posts: 28
    Options
    @AllyJay Yep, BreastScreen NSW employs the mantra of 'younger women, dense breasts, false positives and the stress caused' ad nauseum as its rationale for not promoting its mammogram program to women starting at age 40.

    Mention older women, dense breasts, false negatives (i.e. 'all clear letters' despite harbouring breast cancer) and BreastScreen NSW's silence is deafening.  It fails to tailor screening to the requirements of each woman but employs a woefully inadequate one-size-fits-all approach. 

    The BreastScreen Reader Assessment Strategy (BREAST) at the University of Sydney notes a mammogram detection failure rate of about 30% with many missed cancers being visible on the image. https://breast-australia.sydney.edu.au/

    Every year the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) releases the BreastScreen Australia Monitoring Report - here's a link to the 2020 report. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2020 (aihw.gov.au)  P. 32 cites that over the past twenty years BreastScreen Australia's rate of detecting cancers at the 'small' stage (≤15 mm) has been declining.
  • NoShrinkingViolet
    NoShrinkingViolet Member Posts: 28
    Options
    @AllyJay Yep, BreastScreen NSW employs the mantra of 'younger women, dense breasts, false positives and the stress caused' ad nauseum as its rationale for not promoting its mammogram program to women starting at age 40.

    Mention older women, dense breasts, false negatives (i.e. 'all clear letters' despite harbouring breast cancer) and BreastScreen NSW's silence is deafening.  It fails to tailor screening to the requirements of each woman but employs a woefully inadequate one-size-fits-all approach. 

    The BreastScreen Reader Assessment Strategy (BREAST) at the University of Sydney notes a mammogram detection failure rate of about 30% with many missed cancers being visible on the image. https://breast-australia.sydney.edu.au/

    Every year the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) releases the BreastScreen Australia Monitoring Report - here's a link to the 2020 report. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2020 (aihw.gov.au)  P. 32 cites that over the past twenty years BreastScreen Australia's rate of detecting cancers at the 'small' stage (≤15 mm) has been declining.
  • NoShrinkingViolet
    NoShrinkingViolet Member Posts: 28
    Options
    @AllyJay Yep, BreastScreen NSW employs the mantra of 'younger women, dense breasts, false positives and the stress caused' ad nauseum as its rationale for not promoting its mammogram program to women starting at age 40.

    Mention older women, dense breasts, false negatives (i.e. 'all clear letters' despite harbouring breast cancer) and BreastScreen NSW's silence is deafening.  It fails to tailor screening to the requirements of each woman but employs a woefully inadequate one-size-fits-all approach. 

    The BreastScreen Reader Assessment Strategy (BREAST) at the University of Sydney notes a mammogram detection failure rate of about 30% with many missed cancers being visible on the image. https://breast-australia.sydney.edu.au/

    Every year the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) releases the BreastScreen Australia Monitoring Report - here's a link to the 2020 report. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2020 (aihw.gov.au)  P. 32 cites that over the past twenty years BreastScreen Australia's rate of detecting cancers at the 'small' stage (≤15 mm) has been declining.
  • NoShrinkingViolet
    NoShrinkingViolet Member Posts: 28
    Options
    @AllyJay Yep, BreastScreen NSW employs the mantra of 'younger women, dense breasts, false positives and the stress caused' ad nauseum as its rationale for not promoting its mammogram program to women starting at age 40.

    Mention older women, dense breasts, false negatives (i.e. 'all clear letters' despite harbouring breast cancer) and BreastScreen NSW's silence is deafening.  It fails to tailor screening to the requirements of each woman but employs a woefully inadequate one-size-fits-all approach. 

    The BreastScreen Reader Assessment Strategy (BREAST) at the University of Sydney notes a mammogram detection failure rate of about 30% with many missed cancers being visible on the image. https://breast-australia.sydney.edu.au/

    Every year the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) releases the BreastScreen Australia Monitoring Report - here's a link to the 2020 report. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2020 (aihw.gov.au)  P. 32 cites that over the past twenty years BreastScreen Australia's rate of detecting cancers at the 'small' stage (≤15 mm) has been declining.
  • NoShrinkingViolet
    NoShrinkingViolet Member Posts: 28
    Options

    @AllyJay Yep,
    BreastScreen NSW employs the mantra of 'younger women, dense breasts, false
    positives and the stress caused' ad nauseum as its rationale for not promoting its mammogram
    program to women starting at age 40.



    Mention older women, dense breasts, false
    negatives (i.e. 'all clear letters' despite harbouring breast cancer) and
    BreastScreen NSW's silence is deafening.  It fails to tailor screening to
    the requirements of each woman but employs a woefully inadequate
    one-size-fits-all approach. 



    The BreastScreen Reader Assessment Strategy
    (BREAST) at the University of Sydney notes a mammogram detection failure rate
    of about 30% with many missed cancers being visible on the image.
    https://breast-australia.sydney.edu.au/



    Every year the Australian Institute of Health and
    Welfare (AIHW) releases the BreastScreen Australia Monitoring Report - here's a
    link to the 2020 report. 
    BreastScreen
    Australia monitoring report 2020 (aihw.gov.au)
      P. 32 cites that over the past twenty years
    BreastScreen Australia's rate of detecting cancers at the 'small' stage (≤15
    mm) has been declining.

  • NoShrinkingViolet
    NoShrinkingViolet Member Posts: 28
    Options

    @AllyJay Yep,
    BreastScreen NSW employs the mantra of 'younger women, dense breasts, false
    positives and the stress caused' ad nauseum as its rationale for not promoting its mammogram
    program to women starting at age 40.



    Mention older women, dense breasts, false
    negatives (i.e. 'all clear letters' despite harbouring breast cancer) and
    BreastScreen NSW's silence is deafening.  It fails to tailor screening to
    the requirements of each woman but employs a woefully inadequate
    one-size-fits-all approach. 



    The BreastScreen Reader Assessment Strategy
    (BREAST) at the University of Sydney notes a mammogram detection failure rate
    of about 30% with many missed cancers being visible on the image.
    https://breast-australia.sydney.edu.au/



    Every year the Australian Institute of Health and
    Welfare (AIHW) releases the BreastScreen Australia Monitoring Report - here's a
    link to the 2020 report. 
    BreastScreen
    Australia monitoring report 2020 (aihw.gov.au)
      P. 32 cites that over the past twenty years
    BreastScreen Australia's rate of detecting cancers at the 'small' stage (≤15
    mm) has been declining.