27 year old lobular carcinoma

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  • Sister
    Sister Member Posts: 4,960
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    Take care, @youngdogmum.  Keep an eye on the redness and your temp.
  • kmakm
    kmakm Member Posts: 7,974
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    I'm glad you've decided to do IVF. I think it's important to give yourself options. Isn't technology marvellous?!

    And wonderful to hear that you're recovering well. When do you think you'll start chemotherapy?

    Have a beaut weekend! Kxox
  • jackie 4
    jackie 4 Member Posts: 45
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    My cancer was also lobular and because if the size of the tumour I had to have a right side mastectomy (chose to have a bilateral mastectomy). Had 17 lymph nodes removed and one showed cancerous cells.  I did not have chemo as was told this type of cancer does not respond well to chemo. Had 5 weeks of radiation then medication.  Early problems with cording but physio provided exercises to help.  Was reassured with the treatment decisions as this was made by a large team and not just one doctor.  Be informed, ask questions but take it step by step.  I too during the early days found it difficult to be positive, waiting for all test results etc. Once I knew the course of treatment I was in a much better state of mind.  I am a lot older than you and it sucks that anyone has to go through this let alone young ladies. 
  • Zoffiel
    Zoffiel Member Posts: 3,374
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    Ive never figured out the emogi thing, but thumbs ups and awesomes and a few WTFs. Mxx
  • kmakm
    kmakm Member Posts: 7,974
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    One always feels better when there's a plan.

    How are you going managing the reactions of your family and friends?

    Glad you're feeling OK. K xox 
  • youngdogmum
    youngdogmum Member Posts: 250
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    @kmakm the worst has been the - why don’t you know the plan yet. I didnt know because  that’s how public health works! They wanted to discuss me at an MDT before giving me misleading info! But for anyone who has never had anything to do with the health system they just don’t understand these things. It gets so repetive explaining! 

    I am also hating that some people find it okay to ask about fertility - I feel like saying is it really the worst thing if we don’t have kids?? People have happy lives without children all the time! 
    Or friends saying “it’ll be fine in a few years you can use these embryos” — yes we could try, but as I’ve explained that involves me coming off the medicine preventing the recurrence of the cancer, highly risky. Then going through pregnancy exposing myself to all those hormones, also highly risky! Plus the general statistics of an IVF embryo actually becoming a child aren’t fantastic I’ve been well warned of that!!! 

    Aside from those two things I’m coping well with all of the questions and interest. :) 

    thank you @Zoffiel!!

    I met with genetics, very undecided if I should go through with testing... they felt highly unlikely to have any mutations with my “risk”. Not sure it would change anything for me really if I don’t ever know the result? 
  • Sister
    Sister Member Posts: 4,960
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    I found it, as many others have, extremely wearing to have to tell people what was going on all of the time, and often they didn't really get it, anyway.  I set up a blog (with hubby's help) while I was recovering from surgery, posting my updates and emotional musings in that, and gave the address to family, friends and colleagues.  This meant that I didn't have to keep going over the same things and I also think that it gave them a real look at what treatment is really like - I still had to wear the mask in public but anyone really interested knew what was going on and I know quite a few followed it.  It also has become my diary record of what the year of treatment was like as it's hard to remember some of it, after the fact.
  • kmakm
    kmakm Member Posts: 7,974
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    Yeah, it's always been the way that having a baby, or not, is up for public discussion. From the stangers or people you barely know who feel free to touch your belly, asking you if you know the gender and then criticise your choice of whether you know or not, or the unwanted advice about the number of kids you have or whether you have them or not. And the knee jerk response to tell you horror birth stories! Like the knee jerk response of people when they find out you've got BC to tell you they knew someone who died from it. Oy if I had a dollar for everytime I'd heard that one...

    I agree that having kids is not the be all and end all of existence. I have them but I always wanted kids. I have several friends and family members who live full and rich child free lives.

    You do you and never mind the rest of them! K xox
  • Sister
    Sister Member Posts: 4,960
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    Having kids is great, but looking at the contentment of my many friends without kids, that seems to be pretty great, too.  Whichever side of the child-proof fence you sit on will have it's rewards and regrets.  Do what you can if you need to, but then just get on with it.
  • kmakm
    kmakm Member Posts: 7,974
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    He's a keeper!!
  • kmakm
    kmakm Member Posts: 7,974
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    I love my short hair so much that I've kept it. It is a bit chilly in the winter though. We had a cold night the other day which reminded me. I'm going to have to find my sleep hat (a bamboo hat with extra fabric to pull down over your ears) from chemo and put it to use again. I still sometimes go to pull my hair over my ears when I get into bed! A year has not undone a lifetime of habit!
  • kitkatb
    kitkatb Member Posts: 442
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    OMG @youngdogmum as someone said "he's a Keeper" alright.    Its his way of helping out and being there for you. Good luck with everything. I've still got a wardrobe full of beanies and hats from friends and family.    xo