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im emotional and raising a teenage daughter who is hormonal

Belinda70Belinda70 Member Posts: 5 New Member
i try to talk to my 14 yr old and im crying an

Comments

  • AfraserAfraser MelbourneMember Posts: 3,144
    Hi @Belinda70
    Can you tell us a little more? Talking to children, if you have been diagnosed, is difficult to start, but many members of the network have been through that and can probably give good advice. Just take a deep breath and tell us what you can. Take care. 
  • Belinda70Belinda70 Member Posts: 5 New Member
    thx for yr reply - i have gone through all the details with her and my mum was staying with me at the time so she helped too but now that im on the medication i find myself more emotional when talking to her about anything to do with being a teenager etc  

  • AfraserAfraser MelbourneMember Posts: 3,144
    That’s all very understandable. Your own emotions are probably very close to the surface. Let your daughter know that the medication is part of the problem, but an important part of your treatment so she knows where it’s coming from. Probably best to take things as slowly as possible. Can your mother assist again? Teenagers are also not always as receptive to such conversations as one might like - a combination of independence, feigned indifference, embarrassment and so forth. If she knows she can always come to you to talk, that’s a good start. Your reactions to medication may settle too, which will help. Best wishes. 
  • Dory65Dory65 Member Posts: 194
    Hi @Belinda70,
    It's completely rational for you to be emotional. I presume you've been recently diagnosed. It's a shock. There are all sorts of tests and decisions to be made. We've all been there. I cried buckets. Your daughter may not know how to process the information you have given her. When my own mum was diagnosed many years ago, I was in my late teens. I just didn't know what to say or do. I went into a kind of denial.  As Afraser says, the heightened emotions do settle down once you know more and have a treatment plan. All the best.
  • Belinda70Belinda70 Member Posts: 5 New Member
    Thanks Dory65 - I really appreciate your reply.  I had my surgery October last year + radiotherapy - now on Goserlin injections monthly to simulate menopause so I can have Anastrazole (tamoxafen had a side effect of blood clots and I have a predispositon to those already).    Some days are better than others and I got to spend a lovely hour with her last night when she coloured, trimmed and blow dryed my hair for me :)   Thanks again Belinda 
  • Belinda70Belinda70 Member Posts: 5 New Member
    Afraser said:
    That’s all very understandable. Your own emotions are probably very close to the surface. Let your daughter know that the medication is part of the problem, but an important part of your treatment so she knows where it’s coming from. Probably best to take things as slowly as possible. Can your mother assist again? Teenagers are also not always as receptive to such conversations as one might like - a combination of independence, feigned indifference, embarrassment and so forth. If she knows she can always come to you to talk, that’s a good start. Your reactions to medication may settle too, which will help. Best wishes. 
    Thanks Afraser - I really appreciate your reply. I had my surgery October last year + radiotherapy - now on Goserlin injections monthly to simulate menopause so I can have Anastrazole (tamoxafen had a side effect of blood clots and I have a predispositon to those already).    Some days are better than others and I got to spend a lovely hour with her last night when she coloured, trimmed and blow dryed my hair for me    Thanks again Belinda 
  • Caz1Caz1 Bayside , Melbourne Member Posts: 268
    I second @Afraser about teenagers! Well put! My daughter gets really prickly with me ( even tho she is past being a teenager) but I know that it is her anxiety about me, and unfortunately that is how it comes out. I guess it’s better out than in! But it’s not easy.  :|

    Nature is cruel to give us teenagers and menopause at the same time!!!!!
  • SisterSister Adelaide Hills, SAMember Posts: 4,686
    I've found withy my teens (boy and girls) that it's important to be honest with them and that includes recognising your own anxieties and responses. And as much as we want our kids to come to us with their questions and problems, giving them permission to seek out other ears which may include family friends, relatives, school or other counsellors.
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