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What to do to regain my strength and energy levels

ChezaHChezaH Gold Coast Member Posts: 351
I have finished my chemo, radiation and now on hormone tablets for nearly 60days.

I just cannot seem to regain my energy levels and was wondering if I should be taking a supplement. I cannot do much before I am puffing and exhausted, I am doing more than when on chemo as that wiped me right out !!  I am going to get blood tests to check,  and I have not been doing any exercise so I am going to start a little walk every day and try to build it up.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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Comments

  • AfraserAfraser MelbourneMember Posts: 3,276
    Walking is what you need. You have not been exercising so you are simply out of practice - muscles get a bit soft, you feel every effort more than you used to. So walk. Set yourself a realistic target for week one - so many steps each day. Then increase the target! Repeat. As you get your body working more, it’ll be easier. Taking it easy during treatment can be helpful - but now is the time to get back into gear. Best wishes! 
  • ChezaHChezaH Gold Coast Member Posts: 351
    Afraser said:
    Walking is what you need. You have not been exercising so you are simply out of practice - muscles get a bit soft, you feel every effort more than you used to. So walk. Set yourself a realistic target for week one - so many steps each day. Then increase the target! Repeat. As you get your body working more, it’ll be easier. Taking it easy during treatment can be helpful - but now is the time to get back into gear. Best wishes! 
    Thanks for that I will certainly be starting tomorrow x
  • LeiaLeia Member Posts: 39
    I agree. I started walking to our letterbox and built up as I felt better. I’ve had a few setbacks but just start again😊 once you can walk 5km, I really suggest you try parkrun. It is a 5km run/walk on Saturday mornings. (Google it) You don’t have to be fast- walkers are welcome. Actually, if you can walk about 3km give it a go- walking with others in a friendly environment gives you a lift 🚶‍♀️
  • arpiearpie Mid North Coast, NSWMember Posts: 4,432
    Make haste slowly, @ChezaH - you've been put thru the mill (both body and mind) & it takes a toll.  The chemo alone can take months to work out of your system & some side effects (fog brain, tiredness etc) can last MUCH longer.  :(   Hopefully you won't get bad side effects from the AIs.

    Do the walks, get back into your hobbies & crafts - anything to take your mind off the current situation - & help to kill time!  

    take care xx
  • jennyssjennyss Western NSWMember Posts: 991
    Dear @ChezaH,
    I can relate to where you are now - I was so pleased to finish chemo after few side effects. But then the tiredness and lack of energy! I think your plan to gradually build up your walking is  good. This worked for me, and I was very happy as I increased  my strength. I like to look at birds and squiz at people's gardens too as I walk. I'll sign off now - time for my morning 20 minute walk.

  • ChezaHChezaH Gold Coast Member Posts: 351
    jennyss said:
    Dear @ChezaH,
    I can relate to where you are now - I was so pleased to finish chemo after few side effects. But then the tiredness and lack of energy! I think your plan to gradually build up your walking is  good. This worked for me, and I was very happy as I increased  my strength. I like to look at birds and squiz at people's gardens too as I walk. I'll sign off now - time for my morning 20 minute walk.


    Thanks for your help, appreciate it hugs cheryl x
  • ChezaHChezaH Gold Coast Member Posts: 351
    arpie said:
    Make haste slowly, @ChezaH - you've been put thru the mill (both body and mind) & it takes a toll.  The chemo alone can take months to work out of your system & some side effects (fog brain, tiredness etc) can last MUCH longer.  :(   Hopefully you won't get bad side effects from the AIs.

    Do the walks, get back into your hobbies & crafts - anything to take your mind off the current situation - & help to kill time!  

    take care xx

    Thank you I used to do so much more but it is annoying me that all I feel like doing is resting but I am determined to get myself moving again, appreciate your support xx
  • ChezaHChezaH Gold Coast Member Posts: 351
    Leia said:
    I agree. I started walking to our letterbox and built up as I felt better. I’ve had a few setbacks but just start again😊 once you can walk 5km, I really suggest you try parkrun. It is a 5km run/walk on Saturday mornings. (Google it) You don’t have to be fast- walkers are welcome. Actually, if you can walk about 3km give it a go- walking with others in a friendly environment gives you a lift 🚶‍♀️

    Thank you xx
  • ChezaHChezaH Gold Coast Member Posts: 351
    jennyss said:
    Dear @ChezaH,
    I can relate to where you are now - I was so pleased to finish chemo after few side effects. But then the tiredness and lack of energy! I think your plan to gradually build up your walking is  good. This worked for me, and I was very happy as I increased  my strength. I like to look at birds and squiz at people's gardens too as I walk. I'll sign off now - time for my morning 20 minute walk.


    Thanks and enjoy your walk xx
  • Emma17Emma17 Member Posts: 37
    @arpie Hi, what chemo regimen did you undergo? How long did it last? After, how many months do you estimate it took for the side effects like brain fog and fatigue to subside for you? Thanks.
  • ChezaHChezaH Gold Coast Member Posts: 351
    Emma17 said:
    @arpie Hi, what chemo regimen did you undergo? How long did it last? After, how many months do you estimate it took for the side effects like brain fog and fatigue to subside for you? Thanks.
    Hi My body could only tolerate 3 x ac each time I was admitted into hospital and nearly past out in the oncologist rooms where I had to stay for over hour before I was allowed to leave started in March with a few breaks tamoxifen for 12 weeks finished in sept then radiation until end October now on hormone tamoxifen tablets been on them ever since
    dont think my body has recovered ( I am 73) so struggling a bit
    hugs Cheryl 

  • AfraserAfraser MelbourneMember Posts: 3,276
    It’s all very varied. I had six months (A/C and Taxol) with no fatigue or nausea and no brain fog. I was 68 at the time. It would perhaps help if one could predict outcomes better but it remains pretty unknown until you start. 
  • ChezaHChezaH Gold Coast Member Posts: 351
    Afraser said:
    It’s all very varied. I had six months (A/C and Taxol) with no fatigue or nausea and no brain fog. I was 68 at the time. It would perhaps help if one could predict outcomes better but it remains pretty unknown until you start. 
    Yes I know it is all a learning game 🥴
  • Cath62Cath62 Brisbane Member Posts: 117
    Hi @ChezaH,

    I am sorry you are feeling as you do.

    I must have been really lucky as despite all the fatigue I never stopped walking all through chemo and radium. I have been taking tamoxifen for about the same time as you. I take it every morning an hr or so after my thyroid tablet. I have battled fatigue with my thyroid for 8 yrs and now have fatigue post treatment but I just push through. I find no matter how fatigued I am a good walk helps me. I have rebuilt some fitness and now my walks are 50 mins 6 days per week. 

    I added pilates once a week to help build muscle and it really helps. I do mine with a physio. I also started water aerobics once a week. It is so lovely in the water and everyone works as soft or hard as they want but it sure feels nice in the water and it is easy on the joints and muscles. Is that something that may work for you. Our local council pool in Brisbane has classes and it is $10 per class for 45 mins. I just love it. 

    I wonder if an exercise physiologist would help. I saw one during chemo and they gave me a few exercises to help the bigger muscles like the thighs. They are really good and it may help motivate too especially if there are any around you that have classes for ladies who have had BC. The one I saw had a zoom pink class during the year and I did that (I did what I could).

    These are just s few ideas for consideration. 

    I hope you feel better soon. Be kind to yourself, maybe chat to your doctor too. Not good to feel that way. 
  • SisterSister Adelaide Hills, SAMember Posts: 4,776
    Walking is good, as is swimming - just take it easy and build up slowly.  I don't know if the YWCA Encore programme is happening at the moment but it's worth looking at if it is.  Also consider a cancer rehab exercise class if there are any in your area, or an exercise physiologist who is familiar with cancer.
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