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gurneys
gurneys Member Posts: 224
Hi everyone, it's been a while since I've been on here and I've returned to hundreds of notifications! I hope everyone is travelling well. I'm now two years post diagnosis and treatment and nearly two years post double tram flap recon. Looking at the next step of recon soon - tattoos! In the long term, I'm still feeling tired but I'm also working full time as a teacher so that may also be a contributing factor. Does the tiredness ever subside? My body has been through a lot. Maybe I should just be a little kinder to it.
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  • iserbrown
    iserbrown Member Posts: 5,564
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    @gurneys well Hello, it is nice to see you able to pop back in here and let us know how you are going!

    gurneys said:


     Does the tiredness ever subside? My body has been through a lot. Maybe I should just be a little kinder to it.

    Very good question and at present I would say No!  It is an ongoing issue for me the fatigue part of it but hopefully in the months to come I can conquer it or at least extend it out a bit further between bouts.  

    Be proud of how far you have come, woo hoo!

    Take care and pace yourself accordingly 



  • SoldierCrab
    SoldierCrab Member Posts: 3,446
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    I am 5 years out and I say no it is still present for me.... nice to see you pop in ....
    @primek might agree with us all ...
  • primek
    primek Member Posts: 5,392
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    Ho and welcome back. Tiredness seems to be an ongoing side effect of cancer treatment. I believe we were going through treatment at the same time.

    I too am working full time and have not fully returned to my old zest. Many days I still need a cat nap.
    Sleep is my most important treatment. So attempting to relax and get enough is huge for me. I have found that focussing on really good nutrition from a wide varieties of food is really important. (My hb is now the highest it's been in my life) And of course exercise. I have struggled getting back to my 6 to 7 days a week exercise without crashing to exhaustion. With help of an exercise physiologist I had a program set...and finally have regained muscle and energy. The secret...do not work flat out...wirk out at a 5 to 6/10. That way there is some energy to carry on. So now I'm happy to manage 3 structured exercise sessions a week and have a reasonably active job. I'm still working on getting more days of exercise in and still having energy to work and care for my home and myself but I'm getting there. 

    I've decided I'm not going to except it's because I'm turning 54 this year. I put more energy into my workday than many co-workers half my age and no being fit is a big part of that so I intend to just keep plodding along. 

    Woohoo on tattoos a coming. I'm waiting for my call gor my nippke reconstruction then I'm going for my tattoos. The icing on the cake so to speak. 

    Kath x

  • gurneys
    gurneys Member Posts: 224
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    Thanks for your comments everyone. Glad to know it seems to be a common, ongoing side effect and not just me. :)
  • LITHGOW1950
    LITHGOW1950 Member Posts: 314
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    I have not been on here for awhile.  I was diagnosed back in August 2015.  I am now 68 and at the last visit to my oncologist,  March this year, in response to my fatigue question she simply said "well you aren't 35 are you"?  She did say in nicely as possible.  
    But really it does not seems how much I do or don't do, I suffer with fatigue.  
    Im on holidays at the moment, so not doing much.....still tired mid arvo.  
    When at home I have no trouble doing water aerobics, balance or stretch class and yoga and walk five mornings a week....and get fatigue. I always feel brilliant (like I'm 35!!!) in the mornings. 
    Before coming away I went to a Natropath and she has put me on a tonic,  so No big change yet but will let you know how I go. 
    Yes just be gentle with yourself.
  • Kiwi Angel
    Kiwi Angel Member Posts: 1,952
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    @gurneys have u have any blood work done recently to make sure u aren’t low in something??
  • Romla
    Romla Member Posts: 2,092
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    I’d second @Kiwi Angel suggestion - two reasons-  one is anaemia and there are 2 types iron/folic acid deficiency.Plus I know a quite a few post menopausal women now on thyroxine as their thyroid gland has slowed (?) Personally I think I am still getting over several anaesthetics from surgery and radiotherapy despite being 16 months post diagnosis but like @primek has indicated exercise has helped a lot with my energy and sleep but needs to be done carefully so as not to overdo it.
  • socoda
    socoda Member Posts: 1,767
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    Hi @gurneys good to see you back. Wishing you all the best for your tatts. Xx 
  • gurneys
    gurneys Member Posts: 224
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    @Kiwi Angel @Romla
    Yes, I had a blood test done recently as I was suspecting something may be up. I also thought my thyroid may be playing up. But it came back all clear in all categories. So nothing going on there. @LITHGOW1950 You're right - I sometimes have to remind myself I'm not 35 anymore! lol. I think it's a combination of everything really - the stress of cancer, the multiple surgeries, the chemo, the fact that it all kickstarted early menopause for me, returning to work so that we can continue to pay the mortgage whilst still balancing being a mum to two small kids...and that underlying fear that is always in the back of my mind every time I have an ache or pain that it has returned...that fear will always be there. Add to that the 'I'm not as young as I used to be"....it all adds up. But I do need to exercise more...just to find the time...and the energy...and add all of that to 

  • iserbrown
    iserbrown Member Posts: 5,564
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    @gurneys
    We all have a heightened awareness of our bodies since we've been though this BC episode.  So pleased for you that everything is normal but always get it checked.

    As to exercise I am currently in the Ex-med program, it's Term 2 that I was accepted into, here's a link if it is something that may interest you.  @kmakm is doing Term 3?

    http://www.exmedcancer.org.au/

    Take care and woo hoo that your bloods are okay!
  • Romla
    Romla Member Posts: 2,092
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    @gurneys the key for me is gentle exercise with minimal impact on daily life which is why I advocate a daily one hour walk.My family accept is my time and only requires a good pair of shoes - I am not a fast walker nor a keen exerciser so I listen to music on my phone to while away the time and helps me to drift off thinking about other things than the exercise at hand - even bought a joggers band on eBay to keep my hands free as. I tripped one day.I was not keen the first few times and found it hard as bit steep around here but after a couple of weeks found it much easier and arrived at the point that I liked and needed to do it.Timing of when I do it each day is important after kids go to school and ,as dark early , before 5 plus the added need to avoid getting drenched.And yes it’s cold now too but easier than hot weather.
  • kmakm
    kmakm Member Posts: 7,974
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    @iserbrown Yes indeed, Term 3 for me.
  • gurneys
    gurneys Member Posts: 224
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    @iserbrown I had a look at the link for the ex-med program as that sounded like a great idea. Unfortunately there are none close to me. :( @Romla - I do need to find time for the gentle exercise. Problem is I work full time and have two young kids - I drop them at before school care, head to work, work a full day, pick up the kids and it's dark by the time we get home. By the time I've put a load of washing on, cooked dinner, bathed the kids and got them into bed, I either collapse in a heap on the couch or go to my desk to do a couple of hours work. I probably need to find the time during my working day instead...but that can also be difficult as a high school teacher. I often don't get lunch until 4pm!
  • gurneys
    gurneys Member Posts: 224
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    Maybe it's time for a career change.
  • Romla
    Romla Member Posts: 2,092
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    @gurneys I do understand as been there done that too.Mine are teenagers but my husband and I are both retired now so much easier.Still I will admit when teaching I tended put student priorities ahead of my own perhaps too much to my own detriment - I retired with nearly 2 years unused sick leave having dragged myself to work when maybe I shouldn’t have.Just saying this gently but might be wise to review for whom and how much you run yourself ragged - you matter and everything falls over if you fall over. Said with kindness - a bit of me time may be in order and you may be surprised that others may help.