First posting

Joanne50steveJoanne50steve Member Posts: 15
edited October 2016 in Newly diagnosed
Hi all,

My name is Joanne and I was diagnosed with bc from my first routine mammogram. Since then, 30 Jan it has been such a roller coaster ride I,m still hanging on.

First a lumpectomy, then mastectomy, not to mention all the diagnostic tests MRI's, ct's heart scans; does it ever end? I know it will but it seems never ending. I now have been told I have over 30 polyps in my stomach, will find out next Wednesday if they are harmless or not, fingers crossed.

Port a cath is being put in on Tues with more visits to surgeon and oncologist next Wed. I asked my GP when I can return to work and he just shook his head and said not for some time yet.

As you can see I am finding my situation very frustrating. I am a very strong person but there are times when I feel that I'm not coping. I do have a very supportive family but I just don't know anyone else in a similar situation. Hoping to connect with others here with similar story's.

Comments

  • dawngirldawngirl Member Posts: 130
    edited March 2015
    Sorry that you've had to join the rest of us on here, and that you're in the whirlwind part of diagnosis and treatment.

    Just wanted to reassure you it does eventually slow down and not be all about appointments.

    I have just finished four rounds of chemo three weeks ago, and start on my amritose inhibitor today. No more appointments for 8 weeks - yay!!!!!!

    I don't know why your GP has told you you can't go back to work. This is a very individual thing but I worked right through my chemo, having it on a Friday do I could spend the weekend doing zip. For the first two rounds I felt pretty muc normal; round three the fatigue hit me every day for three weeks but I still worked through it; and round four I went back to work the following day and haven't stopped.

    Perhaps take a wait and see approach. If you have a supportive employer consider a part time return if that will work for you.

    Wishing you all the best for next week and beyond.

    x
  • dawngirldawngirl Member Posts: 130
    edited March 2015
    Sorry that you've had to join the rest of us on here, and that you're in the whirlwind part of diagnosis and treatment.

    Just wanted to reassure you it does eventually slow down and not be all about appointments.

    I have just finished four rounds of chemo three weeks ago, and start on my amritose inhibitor today. No more appointments for 8 weeks - yay!!!!!!

    I don't know why your GP has told you you can't go back to work. This is a very individual thing but I worked right through my chemo, having it on a Friday do I could spend the weekend doing zip. For the first two rounds I felt pretty muc normal; round three the fatigue hit me every day for three weeks but I still worked through it; and round four I went back to work the following day and haven't stopped.

    Perhaps take a wait and see approach. If you have a supportive employer consider a part time return if that will work for you.

    Wishing you all the best for next week and beyond.

    x
  • Joanne50steveJoanne50steve Member Posts: 15
    edited March 2015
    Thank you for reading my rant. I do know it will get better. It's just another world at the moment. On Wednesday I will know when chemo will start and things will settle down I'm sure, back to a new normal.
  • KerynKeryn Sale, East Gippsland, VictoriaMember Posts: 121
    edited March 2015

    Hi, I agree it is a rollercoaster to begin with and you just have to go with the flow. I had a small business i ran by myself and still did all through my treatment and recovery. Because it was my own I was able to close when I felt shity and open the rest. I found that the support and well wishes of the general public helped keep me motivated and looking to the future. If you want to work, you should have a chat with your employer and see if they are willing to be a bit flexible with your hours. Most will, its worth a shot, but dont over do it and fall in a heap. (Must admit, I did!)

    I am not 2 years post all treatment and enjoying life with family and friends and NO appointments apart from routine check ups.

    Hold on tight and see where lifes journey takes you, I have a new look on life because of my cancer and have done things I didnt think I would ever do. So there is life and love after bc, you just have to look under the right rock.

  • KerynKeryn Sale, East Gippsland, VictoriaMember Posts: 121
    edited March 2015

    Hi, I agree it is a rollercoaster to begin with and you just have to go with the flow. I had a small business i ran by myself and still did all through my treatment and recovery. Because it was my own I was able to close when I felt shity and open the rest. I found that the support and well wishes of the general public helped keep me motivated and looking to the future. If you want to work, you should have a chat with your employer and see if they are willing to be a bit flexible with your hours. Most will, its worth a shot, but dont over do it and fall in a heap. (Must admit, I did!)

    I am not 2 years post all treatment and enjoying life with family and friends and NO appointments apart from routine check ups.

    Hold on tight and see where lifes journey takes you, I have a new look on life because of my cancer and have done things I didnt think I would ever do. So there is life and love after bc, you just have to look under the right rock.

  • belmckennabelmckenna Member Posts: 534
    edited March 2015

    I want to say hello, I was diagnosed 5 months ago, and have had most of my chemotherapy with one left to go.  You have joined a very big club Im affraid, but with this website you will find massive support and fantastic advice.  My advice is, keep an open mind on any subject because, THERE IS ONLY ONE YOU!  If you get a chance to read some of our older posts, or if you need any questions answered, you will find it here.  But the work thing always gets me.  I have heard time and time again "Oh, I climbed a mountain, and carried on without a problem!"  which only make many of us question why we cant.  Each treatment is different, each person has different side effects, and we all are a different age, fitness level,  different genetics, health issues, and its just a day by day thing for all of us.  Make no mistake, I am very happy for those who are well enough to not suffer much, and carry on regardless, of course thats fantastic.  But me, I have quite a physical job, and am faced with sick people each day at work.  so I am expecting to take a year off.  If I can go back earlier, well that fine, but as a wise woman told me at the seminar I went to, those who dont rest when they need to seem to take longer to recover, in the long run. (a doctors words).  So, just see how you go, and we shall all rejoice for those who can go back to work!  We are all different!  Good luck lovely, welcome to the wild side!

     

  • dawngirldawngirl Member Posts: 130
    edited March 2015
    Totally agree with Bel. Each one of us faced with this deals with it differently , reacts differently and taking it a day at a time too is a good approach. I haven't read of anyone bragging that they've climbed a mountain but certainly it is not always bad for all of us all of the time, so if you're feeling up to work or being out and about go for it. The doctors taking care of me have all been very supportive and encouraging of my working and exercising if I felt like it, and I have. The research is in that those who continue to exercise through chemo will cope better and recover more quickly, even if its a walk to the post box and back that is all someone can handle on some day.
    I have also taken every opportunity to be horizontal in between shifts, or when I needed it. Chemo is behind me now, and I do wish at times I could have just said I'm taking three months off or whatever, but running my own business it wasn't an option. It would have collapsed and then I could have dealt with that stress on top of everything else.
    Listen to your body, your head, and your heart. they won't lead you astray on what's the right way for you.

    I remain very grateful that I was able to function almost as normal through treatment.

    Now let the hair growth begin!!!!!

    x
  • belmckennabelmckenna Member Posts: 534
    edited March 2015

    Woops, my bad sense of humour - there have been no mountains climbed by any breast cancer sufferer as far as Im aware.  Interestingly I have thought a lot about going back to work and that subject, and Im only half way through my treatment.   Lots of people go back to work, and I must say, in my experience, they have been self employed, or office workers.  I do have a story about my friend who  is 3 years down the track since she had all her treatments for BC.  She went back to her Govt. Office job where she analysed cases for disability assistant, face-to-face.  She wasnt in a typical job, like mine, as a Pharmacy Assistant, that handles "sick" people daily.  In her experience, of going back to her job, she told me that she went back a year ago (not straight away), and she said initially she got sick regularly, plus glandular fever, and had to change her job!   Mind you she was promoted to a non contact with people role, thank you govt. job!   I am stil a long way from going to work yet, some-times I forget why I walked to the other side of the kitchen.  By all means go back to work, every-one is different!

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