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DCIS - oncologist?

Jess33Jess33 Member Posts: 10
I was diagnosed with moderate DCIS and after a double mastectomy other stuff was found in both breasts but no aggressive cancer. It’s been mentioned lately about seeing an oncologist. I wasn’t referred to one and unsure why and if it’s necessary… cost and time off work is a huge issue…does anyone have any ideas about if I should follow this up or not and why? I have a strong family history of breast cancer. Thanks  
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Comments

  • June1952June1952 Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 1,444
    If it is a query in your mind it would be a good idea to follow that up for the peace of mind.  Everyone I know who had DCIS and mastectomy had been referred to an oncologist.  With a strong family history of BC it would be a discussion you should have, for the sake of your children as well as you.
  • AfraserAfraser MelbourneMember Posts: 3,889
    Who has mentioned seeing an oncologist? If it’s a medical
    practitioner, then wise to follow the recommendation. It may be possible to see someone at a convenient time and place. It may result in nothing more than regular checks, given your family history, which seems sensible. Nearly nine years on from my mastectomy, and no family history,  I have annual checks for peace of mind. 
  • iserbrowniserbrown Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 5,032
    Perhaps watching this BCNA podcast may help

    "Episode 24: DCIS" https://www.bcna.org.au/understanding-breast-cancer/resources/podcasts/episode-24-dcis/
  • Jess33Jess33 Member Posts: 10
    Afraser said:
    Who has mentioned seeing an oncologist? If it’s a medical
    practitioner, then wise to follow the recommendation. It may be possible to see someone at a convenient time and place. It may result in nothing more than regular checks, given your family history, which seems sensible. Nearly nine years on from my mastectomy, and no family history,  I have annual checks for peace of mind. 

    It was someone here and my aunt who both asked me if I had an oncologist. I hadn’t heard of an oncologist before reading posts here. Surgeon and gp never mentioned it.
  • AfraserAfraser MelbourneMember Posts: 3,889
    Ah, then a phone call to your surgeon may clarify if he/she thinks it’s necessary or helpful. It may come down to your choice. I can fully understand not wanting to take more time out or incur further costs, but you may find a check is good for your long term equanimity. Most of us can only advise from our own experience. Which can be very helpful but sometimes it’s just that - someone else’s situation not yours. It’s nearly always well meant though, people concerned for your wellbeing. A quick chat will probably sort everything out. Best wishes. 
  • Julez1958Julez1958 SydneyMember Posts: 401
    Hi there
    When I was diagnosed last year and had a mastectomy  I saw my GP, a breast cancer surgeon , plastic surgeon, radiation oncologist and oncologist.Not to mention the multitude of scans.
    I am still seeing my GP , breast cancer surgeon , plastic surgeon ( should finish after the next surgery) and oncologist every few months and have to see the radiation oncologist in January one year after my radiation therapy finished.
    It’s a lot of appointments not to mention costs, but as my breast cancer surgeon recommended I see an oncologist I am following his guidance.
    I understand they treat the cancer holistically following the surgery  including supervising any drugs ( such as tamoxifen or one of the AIS ) and chemotherapy.
    I also understand it is almost universal to be under the care of an oncologist after a diagnosis of breast cancer , but of course everyone is individual and your Doctors will recommend what they thinking best for your particular circumstances.
  • StrongCoffeeStrongCoffee Member Posts: 112
    I mentioned to you that my oncology referral sort of didn't get done following my surgery, I'm assuming due to confusion over if I was seeing one privately.

    I only needed to see a medical oncologist and first saw them through the hospital. Public hospital appointments are excruciatingly frustrating. You can't have any input into the day or time and they say to allow 4 hours for a 20 minute appointment. Thankfully they did my next 2 appointments via telehealth!

    On the last call, I asked if I could see her through her private practise which, as I'm not a very complicated case, she said yes to.

    It's still a bit of travel but so much better than the hospital system. I can get an appointment late in the day so I don't have to miss much work (no sick leave left now, so the appointment fee is much cheaper than a lost day of wages).

    So if your surgeon does suggest you see an oncologist, I can recommend seeing one privately if you want to minimise the impact on work etc.
  • Julez1958Julez1958 SydneyMember Posts: 401
    Yes my experience has been as a private patient which has been costly all up but the experience has been very good.My  oncologist is actually very reasonably priced.
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