Paclitaxel

ChezaH
ChezaH Member Posts: 549
edited May 2020 in General discussion
Hi all, my next lot of treatments are Paclitaxel when I am well enough
to start, and would like to know from anybody that has gone through this
one or going through, helpful hints on side effects, recommendations on
how to handle myself through these treatments as I am rather concerned ,
as my body was only able to handle 3 rounds of ac. thanks for any
information that you can give Hugs xx
«1

Comments

  • Afraser
    Afraser Member Posts: 4,327
    Most people find paclitaxel (or Taxol) easier than A/C. As I had no immediate side effects from A/C (apart from hair loss) I found Taxol
    more troublesome but mainly just that - annoying. As my oncologist said, Taxol is hard on soft tissue - so issues with nose, mouth and maybe eyes are not uncommon. Occasionally blurred vision, bloody noses and problems with taste. I lost most of my taste buds, and had a crusty, sometimes bloody nose, no eye issues. You may be advised not to rush off for an eye test if you have any eye issues as most of these side effects clear up really quickly once you stop taking Taxol. The one I would look out for is peripheral neuropathy due to damage to nerve endings in your fingers and toes - because it can linger long after chemo is finished. Ice treatment during infusions seems to help and quite a number of people on the network can advise. First symptoms are tingling in the fingers or toes - ice treatment works best if used from the very beginning, ie before any symptoms, so worth talking to your oncologist/ day oncology about it if you wish to try it. I didn’t know about ice treatment when I was having chemo, but I found that vitamin B helped reduce symptoms.

    Many people never get PN or get it really mildly. Best thing about round 2 is that you can start to see the light at the end of the chemo tunnel! Best wishes. 
  • ChezaH
    ChezaH Member Posts: 549

    Afraser said:

    Most people find paclitaxel (or Taxol) easier than A/C. As I had no immediate side effects from A/C (apart from hair loss) I found Taxol
    more troublesome but mainly just that - annoying. As my oncologist said, Taxol is hard on soft tissue - so issues with nose, mouth and maybe eyes are not uncommon. Occasionally blurred vision, bloody noses and problems with taste. I lost most of my taste buds, and had a crusty, sometimes bloody nose, no eye issues. You may be advised not to rush off for an eye test if you have any eye issues as most of these side effects clear up really quickly once you stop taking Taxol. The one I would look out for is peripheral neuropathy due to damage to nerve endings in your fingers and toes - because it can linger long after chemo is finished. Ice treatment during infusions seems to help and quite a number of people on the network can advise. First symptoms are tingling in the fingers or toes - ice treatment works best if used from the very beginning, ie before any symptoms, so worth talking to your oncologist/ day oncology about it if you wish to try it. I didn’t know about ice treatment when I was having chemo, but I found that vitamin B helped reduce symptoms.

    Many people never get PN or get it really mildly. Best thing about round 2 is that you can start to see the light at the end of the chemo tunnel! Best wishes. 

    Thanks for the information, I have had lots and lots of side effects with ac so very worried about the next treatment. My system is totally wrecked at the moment. Thanks xx
  • Afraser
    Afraser Member Posts: 4,327
    You are more likely to find it much easier than not, so don’t get too alarmed. Most people find it relatively straightforward, even if they have had a bad time with A/C. And the most common problems, which are a nuisance rather than harmful, clear up really fast at the end. The experience of one chemotherapy doesn’t necessarily imply much for the next one. Deep breaths! 
  • ddon
    ddon Member Posts: 349
    I was really worried about the taxol because I just was at the end of myself after the AC, even though realistically my body handled it ok. I just felt dreadful. The oncologist and the chemo nurses assured me it would be easier but I didn’t really believe them. They were right - I used ice packs on my hands and feet and I came out the other end with minor changes in sensation in a few finger tips but nothing serious. My nose would bleed a little every time I blew it and my taste buds were pretty ordinary on days 3 and 4 of each cycle. Other than that, I found it really easy until the last 3 and then I found it had all built up and I just got really tired and my muscles started to ache. 
    Compared with AC it was nothing to stress about at all, so while everyone is different, I think it’s reasonable to say it just isn’t as nasty as the AC and most likely you will tolerate it much better. 
  • ChezaH
    ChezaH Member Posts: 549

    ddon said:

    I was really worried about the taxol because I just was at the end of myself after the AC, even though realistically my body handled it ok. I just felt dreadful. The oncologist and the chemo nurses assured me it would be easier but I didn’t really believe them. They were right - I used ice packs on my hands and feet and I came out the other end with minor changes in sensation in a few finger tips but nothing serious. My nose would bleed a little every time I blew it and my taste buds were pretty ordinary on days 3 and 4 of each cycle. Other than that, I found it really easy until the last 3 and then I found it had all built up and I just got really tired and my muscles started to ache. 
    Compared with AC it was nothing to stress about at all, so while everyone is different, I think it’s reasonable to say it just isn’t as nasty as the AC and most likely you will tolerate it much better. 

    Thank you if its like that I will be happy hugs x
  • ChezaH
    ChezaH Member Posts: 549

    Afraser said:

    You are more likely to find it much easier than not, so don’t get too alarmed. Most people find it relatively straightforward, even if they have had a bad time with A/C. And the most common problems, which are a nuisance rather than harmful, clear up really fast at the end. The experience of one chemotherapy doesn’t necessarily imply much for the next one. Deep breaths! 

    Thanks need lots of reassurance hugs x
  • kezmusc
    kezmusc Member Posts: 1,544
    Hi @Berchel14,

    AC is ghastly.  Hopefully you find the Paclitaxel far easier.  I had only minor issues with this one.  A walk in the park compared to AC.  
    Best wishes.  xoxoxo
  • ChezaH
    ChezaH Member Posts: 549

    kezmusc said:

    Hi @Berchel14,

    AC is ghastly.  Hopefully you find the Paclitaxel far easier.  I had only minor issues with this one.  A walk in the park compared to AC.  
    Best wishes.  xoxoxo

    Thank you as I am really concerned after how sick I have been and still not recovered from AC Hugs xx
  • Shellshocked2018_
    Shellshocked2018_ Member Posts: 283
    Hi Berchel14,
    I finished my Paclitaxel last year in June.
    Its nothing like AC, most of us struggle with AC you are not alone it’s evil.

    Pactlitaxel builds up in your system over the weeks that you have it, as time goes on you will get more tired and lethargic, this is normal. Your oncologist will discuss with you regarding neuropathy, which can develop in your hands and feet. This side affect will be monitored closely as neuropathy can be with you for life, so be honest and open with your nurses and oncologist, don’t think that you can just tough it out. Some people don’t get the full 12 rounds so don’t be discouraged if this happens. My last 2 doses were reduced due to pins and needles in my feet and hands.There were ladies that didn’t finish due to issues who were having treatment at the same time as me.
    Listen to your body and rest when needed, drink plenty of fluids and gentle exercise if possible.
    During this treatment I was able to get out to the shops with hubby for shopping, I was extremely careful and wore a face mask and was diligent with hand sanitiser. This is something that wasn’t heard of during AC treatment.
    After treatment finished I felt much better after just after a few weeks, recovery time was much better.
    You have done the hard yards, Paclitaxel is a walk in the park compared to AC and Radiotherapy was even easier.
    Good Luck xx
    Any other questions don’t hesitate to ask.
    Sending hugs x
  • ChezaH
    ChezaH Member Posts: 549


    Hi Berchel14,
    I finished my Paclitaxel last year in June.
    Its nothing like AC, most of us struggle with AC you are not alone it’s evil.

    Pactlitaxel builds up in your system over the weeks that you have it, as time goes on you will get more tired and lethargic, this is normal. Your oncologist will discuss with you regarding neuropathy, which can develop in your hands and feet. This side affect will be monitored closely as neuropathy can be with you for life, so be honest and open with your nurses and oncologist, don’t think that you can just tough it out. Some people don’t get the full 12 rounds so don’t be discouraged if this happens. My last 2 doses were reduced due to pins and needles in my feet and hands.There were ladies that didn’t finish due to issues who were having treatment at the same time as me.
    Listen to your body and rest when needed, drink plenty of fluids and gentle exercise if possible.
    During this treatment I was able to get out to the shops with hubby for shopping, I was extremely careful and wore a face mask and was diligent with hand sanitiser. This is something that wasn’t heard of during AC treatment.
    After treatment finished I felt much better after just after a few weeks, recovery time was much better.
    You have done the hard yards, Paclitaxel is a walk in the park compared to AC and Radiotherapy was even easier.
    Good Luck xx
    Any other questions don’t hesitate to ask.
    Sending hugs x


    Hi Berchel14,
    I finished my Paclitaxel last year in June.
    Its nothing like AC, most of us struggle with AC you are not alone it’s evil.

    Pactlitaxel builds up in your system over the weeks that you have it, as time goes on you will get more tired and lethargic, this is normal. Your oncologist will discuss with you regarding neuropathy, which can develop in your hands and feet. This side affect will be monitored closely as neuropathy can be with you for life, so be honest and open with your nurses and oncologist, don’t think that you can just tough it out. Some people don’t get the full 12 rounds so don’t be discouraged if this happens. My last 2 doses were reduced due to pins and needles in my feet and hands.There were ladies that didn’t finish due to issues who were having treatment at the same time as me.
    Listen to your body and rest when needed, drink plenty of fluids and gentle exercise if possible.
    During this treatment I was able to get out to the shops with hubby for shopping, I was extremely careful and wore a face mask and was diligent with hand sanitiser. This is something that wasn’t heard of during AC treatment.
    After treatment finished I felt much better after just after a few weeks, recovery time was much better.
    You have done the hard yards, Paclitaxel is a walk in the park compared to AC and Radiotherapy was even easier.
    Good Luck xx
    Any other questions don’t hesitate to ask.
    Sending hugs x

    Hi not sure what your thoughts are on drinking alcohol I enjoy my glass of wine, thanks Cheza xx
  • Tinks
    Tinks Member Posts: 234
    My onco advised that a glass of wine with dinner was OK for me on paclitaxel. It didn’t cause any side effects for me and I think it helped my not very good appetite a bit.  Check out with your onco?

    lots of love Tinks xx
  • ChezaH
    ChezaH Member Posts: 549

    Tinks said:

    My onco advised that a glass of wine with dinner was OK for me on paclitaxel. It didn’t cause any side effects for me and I think it helped my not very good appetite a bit.  Check out with your onco?

    lots of love Tinks xx

    Thank you hugs Cheza xx
  • ChezaH
    ChezaH Member Posts: 549

    kezmusc said:

    Hi @Berchel14,

    AC is ghastly.  Hopefully you find the Paclitaxel far easier.  I had only minor issues with this one.  A walk in the park compared to AC.  
    Best wishes.  xoxoxo

    Hi Kezmusc, I love my wine and wondering if you drank while on chemo ?? hugs cheza xx
  • kezmusc
    kezmusc Member Posts: 1,544
    @ChezaH

    Lets just say I was quite social the whole way through.  We had heaps of events already planned for that time before stupid cancer stuck it's nose in and I don't do "dry parties".  Actually I'm flat out doing a dry week, chemo or not lol :wink: 
  • ChezaH
    ChezaH Member Posts: 549

    kezmusc said:

    @ChezaH

    Lets just say I was quite social the whole way through.  We had heaps of events already planned for that time before stupid cancer stuck it's nose in and I don't do "dry parties".  Actually I'm flat out doing a dry week, chemo or not lol :wink: 

    Thanks Kezmusc yes I love my wine and love sitting with my husband and having a wine in the afternoon. Hope you are feeling ok sending hugs x