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Remedial Massage with a Portacath

kamadakamada Member Posts: 64
edited August 10 in Health and wellbeing
Just wondering if anyone here has any knowledge about having a remedial massage with a portacath. I am very tight across my upper back/shoulders and getting mild headaches. I don't have lymphoedema thank goodness. I am on Herceptin and Letrozole and am not sure if they could be causing the headaches. It has occurred to me that a massage to loosen things up may give an answer and make me feel a whole lot better. Do any of you lovely ladies know if it would be safe and do you know if using a sports orientated massage therapist would be ok? I am starting to feel a little grumpy and fed up.  :/
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Comments

  • Blossom1961Blossom1961 Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 1,677
    I had a lovely massage after chemo but before my surgery and whilst my port was still in. My Oncologist was in full support.
  • kamadakamada Member Posts: 64
    @Blossom1961 that sounds promising. Did you use a special therapist? All the ones around here seem to specialise in sport related injuries. I suppose their training would cover other fields as well. I have never had a massage before so am pretty ignorant about it all. 
  • Blossom1961Blossom1961 Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 1,677
    I went to a day spa. Had a body exfoliation, followed by a cocoon wrap, followed by a luxurious moisture massage. It was absolute bliss. They did require a letter from my Onco to say it was okay. I felt like I was in school and needed a permission slip from my parents. 🤣
  • Blossom1961Blossom1961 Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 1,677
    If you ring around, you will find someone who can help with the tightness. I mainly went because I wanted to feel spoilt after chemo.
  • kamadakamada Member Posts: 64
    @Blossom1961 My god that sounds divine! Wish I had done that after chemo. Maybe an idea for a luxurious Christmas present if COVID restrictions allow it. I will see what I can come up with for a more mundane venture into the world of massage in the meantime. Thanks for your input 😘
  • ZoffielZoffiel Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 3,055
    If you somewhere it's allowed, go for it. Pick wisely, choose someone who is not going to start grinding their elbow into the back of your neck--dunno how I ended up in that spot, but my eyes still water at the memory.

    Perhaps aim for a business from whom you can claim a health fund refund (even if you don't have a insurance) as you are more likely to find someone is is both qualified and sensible. Ask your breast care nurse for a recommendation--even if it's only advice about where she wouldn't go. 

    i had a delicious massage from a qualified practitioner who used a warm cup across my chest, carefully avoiding the port itself-- I could literally feel my neck relaxing. No force, no pressure, just lovely. Mxx

  • Blossom1961Blossom1961 Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 1,677
    Mmmmm, just the memory makes me melt. Oops, that sounds a bit sensual. But ohhhhh, it was so lovely.
  • noosa_blue150noosa_blue150 Buderim QLD Member Posts: 15
    I am lucky enough to live on the Sunshine Coast , and a wonderful organisation called Bloomhills is available for cancer patients. They specifically offer remedial massage for cancer patients. When I asked I was told that a “normal” Remedial massage is not recommended for cancer patients in early days , and that it needs to be gentle.  Do check with your oncologist as to the degree of pressure they should be applying. Most masseurs I’ve used in past applied pressure that’s now not actually good for me as I sit here on chemo first, Then surgery Treatment down the track . My understanding is that My lymph nodes appear unaffected At U/S and scan but until sentential lymph nodes checked there’s risk with a massage that’s too hard 
  • kamadakamada Member Posts: 64
    That is interesting @noosa_blue150. From your tag I guess you are up Noosa way - a bit too far for me to travel from north of Brissy for a massage tempting as it may be! I am finished with surgery, chemo and rads thank goodness but will check with my oncologist before making the decision. Fortunately heat packs, stretches finally led to a loud click that has eased the discomfort so I am not desperate any more. I hope your Chemo isn’t too grim. It is a process that isn’t pleasant but doable and you know it is for a limited time which helps somewhat. You must be relieved that the nodes look clear so far. I was when mine looked good with US but it is the icing on top when post surgery tests agree. Just had one year mammo and U/S and am waiting on results. Even though I think it is unlikely that they will show anything at this stage it is still an edgy time. Still I suppose I will have to get used to this happening every year. Oh the joys of being a member of this club! Best of luck with your treatment 😘
  • noosa_blue150noosa_blue150 Buderim QLD Member Posts: 15
    Thanks Kamada. I have tolerated three sessions of AC chemo fortnightly , with meds for digestive system , regular mouthwashes to help. No nausea . Very tired and hair loss after two weeks. Due for one more AC chemo, then onto Weekly paclitaxel and then Trastuzumab /herceptin Every three weeks I think it is for more months . Breathless at Times when walking but continue on gently as,it’s good for me . It’s quite a pathway -,as you said a little,unnerving with no definitive status of lymph nodes u til,down the track once sentinel lymph nodes checked and lumpectomy or mastectomy happens. Body scan and u/s at moment appear clear microscopically . 
  • noosa_blue150noosa_blue150 Buderim QLD Member Posts: 15
    forgot to,add - my masseuse had a special “pillow” that she offered to use , if my Portacath felt sore on lying down on the table. I was fine and I didn’t need it .
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