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Lymphoedema

good evening ladies, would anyone be able to tell me if you have one sentinal node remove, and thats the only node effected, are you at risk of lymphoedema? 

Comments

  • kmakmkmakm MelbourneMember Posts: 7,955
    edited September 2018
    Only a little bit! It's highly unlikely but statistically not impossible. It's usually described as low. When I was looking at it (I had a SNB) I generally found stats that said less than 5%. K xox
  • AfraserAfraser MelbourneMember Posts: 3,278
    Statistically, the odds are very low if you only have one node removed. I have lymphoedema but I had 17 nodes removed (only one was malignant but several looked deeply suspicious, so fair enough to remove them). Stats get less helpful after 5 or 6 and an element of luck cuts in then I suspect. Best wishes
  • arpiearpie Mid North Coast, NSWMember Posts: 4,433
    Hi @Spirit-Harmony  - I had 3 or 4 nodes removed in mid January (pulled out, not surgically cut out - not sure if that makes any difference) and none of them were positive.   I haven't had any problems so far, but was just warned to be aware, just in case.

    All the best 

  • SisterSister Adelaide Hills, SAMember Posts: 4,779
    The bc nurse discussed lymphoedema with me before I went in to have the partial and sentinel node but as the others say, I think the risk is fairly low.  Even so, it doesn't hurt to do the stretching regularly.  I went to a well-being session earlier in the week and the president of the SA Lymphoedema Group passed on an exercise that is supposed to help the lymphatic system after mastectomy.  Apparently, the key thing is SLOOOOWWWW.  Stand straight with arms out to the side at chest height and bring your hands in to your chest (so your elbows are sticking out the the side) with the palms facing your body.  Okay, you're now in the right position.  For a slowish count of five, breathe in while moving your hands out to the side, extending your arms and keeping them at chest height.  Hold position and breath for a further count of 5.  Then bring your arms back, breathing out for a count of 5.  Do this 5 times.
  • ZoffielZoffiel Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 3,114
    Lymphoedema is tricky and no one can really predict who will get it and who won't. People who have not had cancer or surgery can still develop it but opinion seems to be that the more nodes you lose during an ax clearance, the higher your chances are.

    I'm finding yoga sun salutations helpful when it comes to keeping mine under control. It's a mlld case which came on after a bout of cellulitis, but the slow stretch combined with the pressure on my arms during the down dog, plank and cobra moves appears to be doing the trick. I blow up a bit at night or if I'm inactive for a few hours and find 8-10 minutes of slow salutations will clear the fluid. 
  • Spirit-HarmonySpirit-Harmony Member Posts: 47
    arpie said:
    Hi @Spirit-Harmony  - I had 3 or 4 nodes removed in mid January (pulled out, not surgically cut out - not sure if that makes any difference) and none of them were positive.   I haven't had any problems so far, but was just warned to be aware, just in case.

    All the best 

    @arpie Thanks for the wishes arpie, unfortunately this particular question was for my niece who has now been diagnosed with the type of cancer as me :( 4 generations now.. but in saying that I think mine must have been taken from the cut as I didn't have a cut under my arm.. hope you are well x
  • arpiearpie Mid North Coast, NSWMember Posts: 4,433
    That's a bugger @Spirit-Harmony  -  has there been any gene testing in the family?

    I only had the one cut totally around the nipple & no cuts under the arm - just ended up with a dint under the arm (where I assume some of the nodes may have been?)  

    All the best for your niece's treatment  xx

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