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Ongoing oestrogen supression

LemonadeLemonade Member Posts: 23
edited July 2018 in Newly diagnosed
Hi

wondering if there are any age 40ish ladies out there premenopausal who have had to decide whether to use tamoxifen daily for up to 10 yrs or goserelin injection every 28 days and exemestane daily.

I am reluctant to be locked in to having an injection every 28 days and wary of the more harsh side effects that go along with it, but my oncologist seems to think I should try it...having already had double mx, 4xAC dose dense and having 10th taxol next week and then will have rads for 6 weeks daily after that I feel that physically and mentally tamoxifen is the preferable choice and will give me a better sense of closure and ability to move on a recover from all of this... thoughts?
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Comments

  • Kiwi AngelKiwi Angel Sydney, NSWMember Posts: 1,952
    Hi @Lemonade I have just finished chemo and have been given similar options to u. I am going to start on tamoxifen and see how I go with side effects as my oncologist says this is actually better than an AI. All so individual though how we are affected. 
  • LemonadeLemonade Member Posts: 23
    Interesting thanks, I have done a bit of googling can’t help myself and most articles tend to say that AI is very rarely suggested for premenopausal women...I think I need a second opinion
  • Kiwi AngelKiwi Angel Sydney, NSWMember Posts: 1,952
    My oncologist suggested it as an option if I can’t handle tamoxifen but I will have to have regular injections to push me into menopause first. 
  • delcar1964delcar1964 Member Posts: 10
    Hi @Lemonade
    I didn’t have Chemo because diagnosed grade one and nothing more had spread. Had radiation and I’ve had the injections for twelve months now and the effects had not been to bad now, I had hot flushes only, so learned to wear layers, so it became manageable. I am 54 and it’s been over 12 months. I am premenapause , I had an allergic reaction to Tamoxifen and exemestane affected my liver, now Ian taking Femara which is going well after three months.
    really all medication will affect us all different. 
    I know that we all have a different journey, all the best in your decisions. 
  • lgray3911lgray3911 Member Posts: 207
    Hi lemonade we have had very similar treatments and I decided to get my ovaries and tubes removed. My own choice not suggested by any specialist. I was diagnosed at 37 and premenopausal and for me the thoughts of getting an injection every month to shut a functioning part of my body down was too much! I worried about the long term effects and freaked out about it! Plus my cancer was oestrogen positive so no brainer for me.  It was keyhole surgery and I was out the next day with no pain. Am now just on 1 tablet a day instead! Works for me! Xx
  • LemonadeLemonade Member Posts: 23
    Ah yes I had kind of forgotten about that option.. will definitely consider it!
  • Kiwi AngelKiwi Angel Sydney, NSWMember Posts: 1,952
    @lgray3911 that is something I have been thinking about doing as well and am going to discuss with my surgeon in a couple of weeks. 
  • RenathaRenatha Member Posts: 27
    Hi @Lemonade, your post got me researching and I found this interesting blog post -https://elynjacobs.com/2012/01/15/natural-alternatives-to-tamoxifen/
    and also came across the concept of an "integrative oncologist" which I found interesting as well.
    I am in a different stage of life (post-menopausal) and after recent surgery (aux dissection) was declared cancer-free as long as I take an oestrogen suppressant. 4 years ago I had lumpectomy and aux clearance and took Arimadex, now wanting to find natural alternatives. As has been said many times, we are all on our own journeys, treatment teams are required to offer standard practice treatment advice, and thanks to some women on this site, I am slowly becoming more proactive about my own health. Wishing you all the best xo
  • LemonadeLemonade Member Posts: 23
    Thanks and yes I am fully onboard with all of that. Since diagnosis we have installed a water filter, switched to a lot more organic, upped the broc and cauliflower I have upped fruit, and upped exercise and relaxation. Diet etc wasn’t ever bad to begin with, but improvements can only help. I think my biggest change is perhaps attitude and refusing to sweat the small stuff anymore and learning to put myself first more often which I will need to remind myself constantly to continue..Also quit alcohol for the main part but hoping to have the occasional glass of
  • kmakmkmakm MelbourneMember Posts: 7,973
    edited July 2018
    @Lemonade I've cut back alcohol drastically since I was diagnosed. I'm a high days and holidays drinker now, with the occasional one in between. I don't really miss it. My skin is so much better without it and my hips sure appreciate the sugar reduction!
  • looeezelooeeze Member Posts: 16
    lgray3911 said:
    Hi lemonade we have had very similar treatments and I decided to get my ovaries and tubes removed. My own choice not suggested by any specialist. I was diagnosed at 37 and premenopausal and for me the thoughts of getting an injection every month to shut a functioning part of my body down was too much! I worried about the long term effects and freaked out about it! Plus my cancer was oestrogen positive so no brainer for me.  It was keyhole surgery and I was out the next day with no pain. Am now just on 1 tablet a day instead! Works for me! Xx
    Sorry to butt in on your conversation, but I am about to start my treatment which includes goserelin as an injection every 28 days. My oncologist did say that I could look at removing ovaries altogether once Ive gone through chemo and Im ready to make that decision. I was just wondering if you have had any major side effects of removing them? Seems like a good solution to me, but am wondering what this sudden change does to the body?  
  • ZoffielZoffiel Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 3,254
    Hi @looeeze i had mine out at 53 a couple of years ago. Yes, the last step into complete menopause was an absolute doozy, but compared to the alternatives it was a no-brainer for me too. I don't regret it one little bit, but it certainly changes your body. My cancer really likes oestrogen and that was the best way for me to deal with that. m
  • looeezelooeeze Member Posts: 16
    I think this is something I will opt for. Like you say it’s probably a no-brainer. I just stress that I am so active now and in a few months I will feel like an old lady. I know I’m being dramatic but when I read all the side effects of everything it just makes me cry 😞
  • ZoffielZoffiel Regional VictoriaMember Posts: 3,254
    That's the shit thing about being dragged into the BC mincer @looeeze We don't want to be here and we definitely don't like the horrible compromises we have to make once we are in the machine.

    In the end, I usually take the option that gives me the greatest chance of survival. Until I'm told to give up wine...
  • looeezelooeeze Member Posts: 16
    Haha totally! I keep reading that you need to check with your oncologist if you are allowed to drink alcohol. That’s one I’m not proactively asking. I figure if it was important that I didn’t drink they would tell me 🤣🤣
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