Isolation Safety

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BlackWidow
BlackWidow Member Posts: 268
edited June 2020 in Day to day
I am wondering if any other ladies are fearing the end of isolation ?
Being somewhat older and with other medical issues I have been self-isolating as much as possible for the last few months, going out for food but keeping the social distancing and using other recommended hygiene measures (no, not masks !).
As things begin to open up I am now looking at who I have close contact with.  I am thinking of their circumstances, where they have been and how many 'community contacts' they may have met.  This is all out of my control.
I feel I want to wait a bit longer and see the effects as schools etc open up and people travel around our State.
Am I being paranoid or just careful and sensible ?
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  • ddon
    ddon Member Posts: 349
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    It’s hard, I think, to just go ‘back to normal’ now after we have heeded the warnings to be careful and even paranoid. I know I am - I am aware that people who aren’t immune compromised are possibly more relaxed and not as careful as I am, and I don’t want to be around them. 
    I have really loved this whole isolation thing. It’s been so relaxing; no visitors, no in laws coming to stay, just my little family and phone calls to everyone else. I don’t really want it to end 😊. I am aware though that not everyone is as fortunate as me to have a husband and 4 kids at home for company.  There are many, many lonely people who would be even more alone during this time. 
     I wanted to see how schools opening up would affect numbers as well. It is disconcerting that the restrictions are all being lifted so fast. 
  • BlackWidow
    BlackWidow Member Posts: 268
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    Thank you @ddon.
    I don't feel so silly now !  I am all alone as my husband has passed away and we were not able to have children.  I have no siblings.
    I agree that the restrictions are being opened too soon.  I look at other countries and feel we did so well but following their openings and the new cases strikes fear in me.
    Admittedly, I don't mind my own company and the phone has been a good friend during this time   :)
  • Afraser
    Afraser Member Posts: 4,388
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    Dear @BlackWidow
    I very much doubt if you are alone! I had two weeks self isolation (coming back mid March from NZ) so was thrown in the deep end - lockdown was actually easier, I could get my own food and medication, and exercise outside my garden (my walking track was leaving a worn ring on the lawn). Most of what I really want to do again (concerts, philosophy and writing classes, gym, museum volunteering) are still out of reach and the cheery indifference of many who can’t work out what 1.5 metres is makes me a bit cross. For all they know I may be a carrier! So I too am taking things very slowly (and I do wear a mask in the supermarket as social distancing is nigh impossible). If you can continue to do so a bit longer without going mad, why not? We’ll feel much more confidant (and thankful) if the second wave does not eventuate. In any event, we will all have to live with this virus for some considerable time, so early adapters to the new normal (isn’t that us?) will have an advantage! Best wishes. 
  • ddon
    ddon Member Posts: 349
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    I do think because Aus has done so well that there many people who will forget very quickly how nasty it has been overseas and it will all take off again so I am with you in your concerns. 
  • Blossom1961
    Blossom1961 Member Posts: 2,396
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    I work in the tourism industry and yesterday had a customer comment “coronavirus is over”! I politely told him that govt regulations require him to fill in the tracing form we have for our guests and if he wanted to stay, he HAD to fill it in. We have sneeze screens and the customers refuse to stand behind them and poke their heads around them to talk. We have sanitiser at the door, and customers refuse to use it. If we get a second wave there will be a good reason for it.
  • June1952
    June1952 Member Posts: 1,865
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    Oh, @Blossom1961, how I feel for you as I have seen that happen in local stores.  Don't people understand why the screens are there ?  One man said he will not use the sanitizer at a store entrance as he reckons it has germs from China in it !  OMG.  I hope the fella completed the form for you, I cannot imagine having to deal with people like that. 
    There again, people attending the 'black lives matter' demonstrations are just ignorant.  Do they not realize they can possibly be taking the virus back to their famiiy and friends ?  They have been told it is not legal right now - and why are they jumping on the back of the US issues ?  Why not wait and have more impact for our country when it is safe to do so.  I think they should all put in money to go to a good cause:  suggestions are to fund specific training for police or perhaps specific education for those who get themselves in trouble.  Let's prevent these issues from happening in the first place. 
    Sorry for going off-track on your post @BlackWidow.
  • Afraser
    Afraser Member Posts: 4,388
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    To be fair, the Black Lives Matter issue is an Australian one too - deaths in custody have not ended and they are far more likely to involve a black detainee. If I overindulged and fell asleep on a train, I would be most unlikely to end up in a cell, even if I couldn’t locate a ticket. It’s just that there are other ways of demonstrating concern, rather than encouraging people to risk themselves and others, during a pandemic. 
  • BlackWidow
    BlackWidow Member Posts: 268
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    Yes @Afraser, I read the post but think she did say Australia has the problem and she even gave some ideas for ways to solve it.  A big demonstration later would highlight our country's problems far more rather than it being hidden behind the US issues as current demonstrations are doing.
    If someone went along then was an unsuspecting virus catcher and passed it through their workplace or family people might think twice about disobeying the authorities during this pandemic.  We have done so well with the virus, why take risks ?
    Can't really picture you falling asleep on a Melbourne train, even though you could probably talk yourself out of a ticket    :)
    @June1952, I like it that you gave ideas for solving the issues here.  I for one would rather take that route and give money for the cause to fix the problem.
  • arpie
    arpie Member Posts: 7,683
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    I am also very wary of getting close to anyone now with the relaxation of rules ...... I can't afford to catch anything & pass it on to hubby, let alone Covid as he is in the highest risk group!   I think we all just need to be alert but not alarmed.

    To be honest, I can't see my uke group getting together (unless in a park) for some months yet, possibly the end of Winter - as there will probably be a spike in general Flu as well as a spike in Covid. 

    I am running the group online on Zoom just now.

    People attending protest meetings may well be putting their health and their family's at risk.  :(   You can't cure stupid!
  • Beryl C.
    Beryl C. Member Posts: 270
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    I am also feeling very cautious as we won't know the consequences of fewer restrictions for a week or two. Like @arpie I am very wary of getting close to anyone and my x3 weekly treatments at the hospital have been my only social outing. Bit weird but that's where I feel safe, it would have to be one of the most sterile locations in the city. (but I digress). I think we maybe in a 'yo-yo' situation until we have a vaccine. The decision to hold protest meetings today shows little consideration for health-care workers and our health system - how much does a covid test cost and who pays?
    Further to your (@arpie) comment on 'stupid' I would add 'anxious' and 'desperate', the need to feel being part of something and an excuse to brush off overall anxiety and uncertainty, ie, 'today I did something and I was with a lot of people and the world felt real!!'