Anyone tried medicinal marijuana or the real thing with chemo

onemargieonemargie queenslandMember Posts: 429
hi there I’m asking this on behalf of a friend who is going through AC chemo at the moment I finished oct last year but we are both curious if anyone has had the medicinal marijuana I know it’s being trialled in NSW at present or was wondering if anyone had had the odd chuff or cookie etc of the real thing and had any success with treating side effects of chemo? 

Comments

  • ZoffielZoffiel Member Posts: 876
    I used a pot and coconut oil infusion during chemo. I had a miserable time in general but no nausea, I think I took two Stemital the whole time so avoided the worst of the constipation associated with antiemetics. It is, of course, illegal to possess and use it and if you get caught driving with it in your system your arse is toast.
    Did it help? Hard to say. I only took it for four days at a time after treatment;  it helped me sleep but I don't like being stoned.
  • onemargieonemargie queenslandMember Posts: 429
    I’m interested from a clinical point of view about the medicinal in particular as it doesn’t have the stoned effect. I’ve never tried either ever actually but I’ve heard some good things about the medicinal one. So was just curious now as is my friend. I’ve also read Melissa Etheridge has some success with the medicinal stuff during her chemo. I totally understand the consequences of using the real deal and like I said have never even smoked a smidge even as a teen but am interested to hear as a nurse in particular any ones opinion. Margie 
  • ZoffielZoffiel Member Posts: 876
    There are hundreds of different cannabinoids. The pot that gets you stoned has been bred to have high levels of THC. The research is looking at the other elements that link to other receptors for different purposes so, in theory, cannabis developed for therapeutic purposes may have little, if any, THC but will have high levels of other cannabinoids that do other things. That's dumbing it down considerably, anyone who wants details needs to do more research.

    The current trials seem to be focusing on nausea and appetite. There is no suggestion, despite some nonsense on the internet, that cannabis will actually affect the course of the disease and it certainly doesn't cure cancer.

    Ten years ago I discovered that constipation was the worst part of chemo so as I had the opportunity to try something else, and knowing I had pharmaceutical back up, I gave it a go. Marg xx

  • viking1viking1 Perth, Western Australia, NORMember Posts: 190
    I would like to know if anyone used the medicinal one helped with pain? I had a sentinel node biopsy which they did with my lumpectomy and they said the nodes were clear when I woke up. A couple of weeks later I found they weren't...it was an error as quite a rush job while you're under. So had a total axillary clearance. I think going in again made the healing harder. This was early July. Now I have a lot of pain in the armpit scar...worse at end of day. I have tried panadol, panadeine forte and not much relief except worse constipation. So am wondering about alternative pain relief. Also, if anyone has tried it, is it safe to buy it legally online in Aus and have it shipped to WA? I wouldn't want to spend the money and never receive it!
  • primekprimek Broken HillMember Posts: 3,182
    @viking1 you may have cording. I saw a lymphatic physio and had laser which setlled my arm a lot and got all my movement back. I needed lyrica for a while after surgery for nerve pain and I only needed a sentinal node. 
  • Brenda5Brenda5 Burrum Heads, QldMember Posts: 1,591
    I haven't really done enough research to advise but this is what I have gleaned so far. The coconut oil and hemp (its correct name) doesn't really give you any high at all. You don't become all chatty on it like if it was smoked in a joint. There doesn't appear to be any dizziness or impairment with the oil. 
    There are different sorts of seeds that are bred and manipulated to target specific symptoms. Its not just all one sort. 
    With the oil method, all of the plant is able to be used, not just the bud bit. 
    The oil once blended can be taken by eyedropper or straight with a teaspoon or put in tea or coffee. There are other ways of taking it for terminally ill including in a suppository.
    The oil can free up frozen shoulders and allow better movement in the elderly.
    In conjunction with chemo it can reduce nausea. On palliative patients who are on perpetual chemo, the oil can help reduce the psi count when just plain chemo looks to be loosing the battle. I would imagine smoking it at that point would work even better.
    The oil can help with chemo brain and only a tiny bit needs to be used once or twice a day. It helps rejoin the damaged neural pathways.
    The oil can help with depression but its not a cure all. It does seem to be gentler on the body than anti depressants.
    For Crones sufferers the oil is a godsend and many have been able to wean themselves (under doctors consultation) off of so many medications and even add a few extra foods to their diet which previously they could only dream of eating.
    The oil applied regularly to wounds will heal it faster as a topical treatment.
    There seems to be a few ways to make the oil and you tube has lots of videos on it.

  • primekprimek Broken HillMember Posts: 3,182
    http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/mentalhealth/Factsheets/Pages/cannabis.aspx

    These is the real issue of using marijuana / cannabis that is not specifically grown for medicinal purposes. 

    Unfortunately there has been many anecdotal claims of what medicinal marijuana can do which are unfounded. The trials thus far are quite strict in it's quidelines on who it may have access and who it may help.

    https://www.medicinalcannabis.nsw.gov.au/clinical-trials
  • lgray3911lgray3911 Member Posts: 97
    I used cannabis oil during chemo.It’s important that the weed is organic and not hydro answer mine was also infused with coconut oil. I didn’t use it for pain relief but to counteract the steroid I had to take when doing my 4 AC. I took it day of chemo and 2 days later just at night time and it’s worked brilliantly! 
  • viking1viking1 Perth, Western Australia, NORMember Posts: 190
    @primek thank you ... I will look up cording. Will also make an appointment with breast physio so she can see or feel what could be wrong. Or maybe it is normal to be in this pain? The op was in early July. The seroma or haematoma in my breast is getting smaller ... one breast physio said seroma and the next said haematoma and only painful to touch. But the Axillary clearance scar is painful 24/7 with no drugs.
  • Beryl C.Beryl C. Member Posts: 20
    I warmed organic castor oil, soaked a piece of towel and placed that in my bra against the scar. The warmth was comforting and I relaxed, lessening discomfort. A couple of weeks post surgery I developed a routine - after my shower I cut the end of a Vit.E capsule and dabbed it onto the scar, some relief and I felt good about being pro-active with my health care. Did a gentle finger tip massage after a few weeks.
    I also have some cording and breast physio 'worked' that for a few sessions - very little discomfort and we had a great 'yarn' each session. It halted the spread of the cording - well worth asking about. I have never experienced pain with my scar tissue - radical auxillary Dec.2011. I would prefer not to take drugs but pain 24/7 will create stress - my preference is Panadol Rapid, the soluble variety. Berylx (also Perth)
  • viking1viking1 Perth, Western Australia, NORMember Posts: 190
    Thank you Beryl...I will try that! Hello fellow Perthite ... few of us here. I am at Charlie's as a public patient...where is you new 'home'?  I try to do Solaris complementary therapies where possible...very relaxing. I hope you are going okayxxx?
  • onemargieonemargie queenslandMember Posts: 429
    Thanks for everyone’s comments on this topic. I was interested to read them all and we will wait and see what the govt does about it too. Margie xx
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